Aldi shopper’s ‘selfish’ hack to slow down speedy checkout staff

Aldi is famous for its staff scanning your items at what feels like 100mph.

It certainly takes some practice to get up to the speed required to pack up your purchases.

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One shopper devised a method which forced checkout staff at the German budget chain to slow down.

The shopper posted a video on Facebook of her leaving large gaps between items she placed on the conveyor belt.

The tactic has divided customers of the supermarket chain
The tactic has divided customers of the supermarket chain
(Image: Facebook/Aldi Fans Australia WS)

It may have made one shopper’s Aldi experience a little more relaxing but it’s increased the stress of other shoppers.

Aldi says a quicker checkout turnover frees up staff to do other work in the store, thereby reducing the critical number of staff.

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Lower staffing costs means the products they sell are cheaper. Some shoppers also like the speed with which Aldi staff reduce their checkout queues.

Understandably opinion on this shopper’s hack has divided opinion.

Aldi staff have their own counter-tactic to get round the sly delaying tactic
Aldi staff have their own counter-tactic to get round the sly delaying tactic

“People like you packing their bag at the register is so annoying and selfish. Try packing at the bench like everyone else,” said one shopper.

But not everyone was so critical, as others thanked them for sharing the tip and even suggested they would try it themselves next time they visit the shop.

One wrote: “Ohhhh, I love it! Packing at Aldi should be an Olympic sport!” And a second said: “Round of applause – this is genius.”

However, two members of the Facebook group who said they work at Aldi revealed that it’s a trick many customers try to employ – and they have their own methods to overcome it.

One staff member replied: “I have customers do this, I just put my arm up to move the belt, let it all build up then start scanning.”

And another said they do exactly the same, writing: “I would hold the first item back from the sensor with my arm until everything piled up.”

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